Isha, Kena, Katha, Prashna, Mundaka, Mandukya, Aithareya, Taittiriya


Please understand, I am following the arrangement as per the Advaithic Tradition. Actually, Ishavasya Upanishad is part of the Yajur Veda, not Rig Veda. But, all Advaithic tradition masters commented on Ishavasya first. The arrangement is very unique: Isha, Kena, Katha, Prashna, Mundaka, Mandukya, Aithareya, Taittiriya. This was the set organized way followed by almost all Advaithic masters. But, originally, in the Vedas itself, they are not organized in this way. Ishavasya Upanishad comes in Yajur Veda. So, they are not organized in the way it is commented by Advaithic masters. May be the masters felt these Upanishads support one by one your enlightenment process; so they organized it. I am following the structure organized by the Advaithic masters.

The first sutra! Please listen! Let us repeat:

ईशावास्यमिदं सर्वं यत्किञ्च जगत्यां जगत् ।
तेन त्यक्तेन भुञ्जीथा मा गृधः कस्यस्विद्धनम् ॥ 1 ॥

Eeshaavaasyamidham Sarvam Yathkincha Jagathyaam Jagath |
Thena Thyakthena Bhunjeethaa Ma Gridhah Kasyasviddhanam ||

In the original writing, the sutra is “Jagathyaam Jagath” (जगत्यां जगत्). But, if you see, when I pronounce, I will be pronouncing as “Jagathu”. This is the way I heard from my masters. It is called “Paata Bhedha”. See, the accent, each master has his own accent. Originally I heard the Upanishads from Isakki Swami, Yogananda Puri, and Vibhootananda Puri – these three. So, when I heard from them, the accent with which I heard is usually revered and respected as “Paata Bhedha”. And, moreover, when I retain the accent, I also remember them, and it is the way of honouring the Guru, retaining the “Paata Bhedha” of the Guru – means, the accent of the Guru – without questioning or trying to correct. It is a kind of respect and reverence shown to the masters in Vedic Tradition. It is called “Paata Bhedha”. Means, your teacher in your area, the way he teaches, the way he chants, the way the accent is maintained, just retaining it. When I heard the same Upanishads in Ramakrishna Mission in Bengal, the pronounciation and accent is a little different: “EeshOvOshyOmidhOm ShOrvOm YOthkinchO JOgOthyOm JOgOth”. Because, in Bengal, all the “ah” will become “oh”. In Bengali, it is never “VivekanAndA”; it is “BiBekanOndO”. So, retaining that accent is the respect given to that Guru, and it is called “Paata Bhedha” in our tradition. The way I heard exactly from my masters, I am repeating, retaining the “Paata Bhedha”. The way I chant – “JagathU”, “dhanammm” – all these additions are not actually available in the form of letter in the original verses. But, I just wanted to retain the purity of the “Paata Bhedha”. I don’t feel “Paata Bhedha” is in any way disturbing the originality of the verses. So I am retaining it as it is.

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About Sri Nithya Sadashivatmananda

Initiated disciple of His Holiness Sri Sri Paramahamsa Nithyananda Swamiji.